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The Hobbit Trilogy [Theatrical and Extended Edition] [4K Ultra-HD] [2012] [Blu-ray] [Region Free]

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Rings. The new 4K presentation is one of the best reference-quality discs I have ever seen. Even those viewers who didn't enjoy in the adventure Somewhat related to this, I saw the documentary Aquarela in HFR today (not a ton of people there, but I can tell HFR was a factor that drove some of the people to the showing) and it does provide great clarity to the image, though some of the fast pans or transitions can be disorienting in HFR for me. Movie itself was not what I expecting, but has merit as well as some choices I didn’t like, and like HFR itself I expect to be divisive (some said it was awesome after, and some people walked out of the movie- much more of an art house documentary despite playing at an AMC multiplex). A curious Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, journeys to the Lonely Mountain with a vigorous group of Dwarves to reclaim a treasure stolen from them by the dragon Smaug. detailed colors than ever before while dark scenes are similarly more enthralling to see. Small details in the grading make all the difference: Bilbo's Rings should go without experiencing the high-adventure of the prequel saga and the 4K UHD presentations are the best available to date.

Hobbit Trilogy - 4K Ultra HD 4K - Zavvi UK The Hobbit Trilogy - 4K Ultra HD 4K - Zavvi UK

The Hobbit: The Motion Picture Trilogy includes The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012), The Desolation of Smaug (2013) and The Battle of the Five Armies (2014). outdoors radiant with terrific color reproduction that is dramatically enhanced by the HDR. This isn't a small upgrade at all: every scene looks

The surround mixes effectively place effects/sounds within the soundstage which place you within the scene, in turn, adding an enriching element that heightens the intended feeling like something is passing overhead, traveling through the room, or emanating from a specific location. The series active moments, such as the encounter with the Goblins in the cave during the third act of An Unexpected Journey, or Bilbo’s interaction with Smaug in The Desolation of Smaug, swallow you up as the revolving, rotating and all-encompassing surround sound comes at you from all sides.

The Hobbit 4K Review: Finally the Trilogy Looks Like Real Movies

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, and The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies The Dol Gudur sequence is one that I was surprised to see cut from the theatrical version. It includes a character that would seemingly carry some weight within the storyline (especially in light of the newly added sequence in the film’s opening), and in watching it I am amazed how the editor was able to cut around it without leaving the sequence in tatters.This is a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release containing the theatrical and extended editions of each of the three films, along with Digital Codes. There are no Blu-rays or bonus features included.

LOTR and Hobbit trilogies coming to 4K UHD | AVForums LOTR and Hobbit trilogies coming to 4K UHD | AVForums

For more about The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 4K and the The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 4K Blu-ray release, see the The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 4K Blu-ray Review published by Neil Lumbard on December 2, 2020 where this Blu-ray release scored 4.5 out of 5. Part of the reason for this decision seems to be the expectation that most fans purchasing the 4K discs will already own previous releases. Another together dwarves, orcs, elves, wizards, and even a special Hobbit – Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman). No fan of The Lord of theI enjoyed the audio presentations of these films in the theater and, have since enjoyed them in the familiar confines of my theater room. Across the board I have found them to be impeccably detailed and, dynamic, resulting in a rewarding listening experience. Not only does the resolution increase impress, the HDR grading is astonishing at every turn. Bright outdoor scenes display more vivid and The extended edition adds 13 minutes of additional footage to the original theatrical release. In my own estimation, the extended footage makes

The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies are being

In general, these Dolby Atmos mixes made for an involving surround sound display. I enjoyed the balance of atmosphere and discrete object placement that sounded fantastic across the board. The teal-orange aesthetic in Andrew Lesnie's cinematography benefits greatly and arguably, offers the more dramatic upgrade in this UHD edition. The Dolby Vision HDR presentation comes with a wider and fuller array of secondary hues throughout, from the striking mix of bubblegum pinks, royal violets and indigo blues of sunsets to the healthy, rosy-peach tones in the faces of the entire cast. Warmer, buttery yellows bathe several interiors scenes like the dinner at Bilbo's or at Rivendell, but other scenes are engulfed in the fiery orange and deep marigold glow of the fire. Gollum also has more of a silver coin tone to him, and the browns in the costumes are impressively varied while reds and greens are more vibrant and richly-saturated, making for a stunning upgrade overall. (Dolby Vision HDR Video Rating: 94/100)" [Excerpt from our review for TheDesolation of Smaug] Although part of the film is about a hidden (literally) threat, but, fortunately, it is completely different from "Episode I: The Phantom Menace". "The Hobbit" is lighter than "The Fellowship of the Ring" and its sequels, its characters look younger, but at the same time it will not disappoint the fans of "The Lord ...". The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey Theatrical Edition- Castilian Spanish, Thai, Polish, Cantonese , Swedish, Norwegian, Korean, Italian SDH, German SDH, Finnish, Danish, Czech, Complex Chinese, English SDHAudio on the 4K disc is included in English Dolby Atmos, essentially the same mix heard in theaters. And like the Atmos for An Unexpected Journey, this is a reference quality surround sound experience, with a fully hemispheric sonic environment. The soundstage is grand, with wonderful activity in the height channels throughout the film—and especially as Smaug stalks the halls of Erebor during the film’s climax. The dialogue is clean, clear, and full sounding, while music and effects offer lovely fidelity. Channel to channel movement is natural and lively, particularly appreciated in moments like the barrel chase from Thranduil’s Silvan Elves in Mirkwood. And the dynamics are tremendous, with muscular bass. This mix dazzles in moments of bluster and calm alike; just listen as Bilbo and Smaug scamper over the piles of gold and jewels in Erebor, with the metallic slush of treasure sliding and shifting all around. The only additional audio option on the 4K EXTENDED EDITION disc is French 7.1 DTS-HD Master Audio, while the optional subtitles include English for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, French, Dutch, and Spanish. (Note that these options are different than those for An Unexpected Journey above.) Additional audio options on the 4K THEATRICAL CUT disc include French 7.1 DTS-HD Master Audio and Spanish 5.1 Dolby Digital, with optional subtitles in English for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, French, Dutch, and Spanish. The Hobbit films reach some of the highest levels of sharpness, clarity and luminance I’ve ever seen rendered on a 4k TV. If you’ve seen the imagery of the Dwarven mines that introduce ‘An Unexpected Journey’ you’ll know what I mean. Their beards glisten, their eyes sparkle, and mining work lights glow like gold on the walls behind them (see the film still). And yet, inserts like the one in which the naturalist wizard Radagast Kariy (Sylvester McCoy), with his face smeared with bird droppings and bulging eyes, goes to the ruins of an eerie fortress in a sleigh pulled by rabbits, are not directly related to the main plot. With the exception of the episode in which Gandalf expresses his fears to the skeptical Saruman (Christopher Lee) that the dragon Smaug, who appropriated the gold and currency reserves of the dwarves, could be used by the "enemy" as a fire-breathing weapon of mass destruction, the storylines regarding the White Council, the Necromancer and The aforementioned Dol-Guldur fortress (all of which are closely related to the "Hobbit" function as a prequel), as yet, have little agreement with Bilbo's relatively modest adventure. Although the hobbit finds the Ring of Omnipotence, the fact that it has to do with Sauron is currently known only to us and the orchestra under the direction of Howard Shore (especially his string group).

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